Use Archetypal Stories to please everyone

I have a soft spot for Disney films with good stories. CarsToy StoryThe Jungle Book (original) and Shrek all rate highly in my opinion.

According to Linzi, when the Disney film Moana came out last year, my face did this at the prospect of seeing it:

Moana face

“Another bloody princess film,” I grumbled to myself.

Anyway, Linzi went to see it without me, and liked it enough to buy the DVD. Which admittedly isn’t a strong indicator of greatness.

And so last week, we sat down to watch Moana.

What do you think… would I like it?

I can tell you I did like it!

The story starts slowly, taking a long time to set the scene. But after that it’s an archetypal quest story. And like any good quest, the true nature of the ‘dark force’ isn’t fully revealed until the end of the story.

While Moana is technically a princess story, refreshingly it isn’t a love story. Nobody on the quest falls in love, or lives ‘happily ever after’. Which as you may imagine, I approve of…

So overall – thumbs up for Moana. And another example that you can please even the grumpiest of rainclouds (like me) by sticking to an archetypal plot.

You can read more about the plot archetypes in my second book Simple Story Selling. Which for the rest of August, comes free with Nurture Email Mastery.

Rob Drummond

Rob Drummond is the founder of the Confusion Clinic. Rob is an Infusionsoft Certified Consultant and copywriter.

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